Jump to content
Ballet Talk for Dancers

Long term Shin Pain after Big Jumps


danceprincess

Recommended Posts

Is it possible to have long term shin splints? I ask because I've had xrays on my back and leg and everything has come back normal but I still have pain in my shins along with numbness and tingling that trickles down to my toes. I've have had this pain since the beginning of the summer. I've been to 3 different doctors and they all can't seem to find anything wrong have advised me to continue icing and to rest. I'm taking the next week off to rest which will include no dancing at all but I'm wondering will this be a long term thing? Could it be something that I'm doing wrong in my dancing that's causing the pain to continue? It's especially bad when I do big jumps...in the landing I can feel the pain shoot through my legs. I'm not sure what else I can do short of not dancing for a while which will kind of be impossible to do in the upcoming weeks.

Link to comment
  • Administrators

Danceprincess, shin splints can definitely be caused by incorrect technique, especially rolling in on landings. Work with your teacher to figure out if you are rolling anytime, and have her especially watch your landings when jumping.

Link to comment

I think you could also consult a physiotherapist -- ask around to find either one who's used to treating dancers, or sports people (I find sports physiotherapists to be really helpful). Make sure you make a habit of a really good stretching routine for calves and shins: the basic runner's calf stretch was what a physiotherapist recommended to me for shin pain.

Link to comment
  • Administrators

What I meant was that if you are rolling your knees and feet inward anytime, not just on jumps, it can cause the problem.

Link to comment

Another cause can be dancing with the weight back in the heels, leading to the muscles at the front of the shins being overworked. As for the numbness/tingling, there is a nerve that runs through the back of the ankle that if interfered with can cause those symptoms - I had them myself! It certainly sounds like you need a dancer-focused opinion - long term pain like that is not acceptable to continue with. Find someone who can treat the issues, and find the cause to stop it from re-occurring.

Link to comment

I had long term shin splints as well. Definitely find a physio who understands dancers. It may be a stress fracture, which can't always be identified by regular X-rays. My shin splints were caused by a combination of problems: tight calf muscles, weak glutes, and not enough plie at the end of a jump. Like you, I could really feel my shin splints when I landed big jumps and they never really went away until I learned to absorb my weight through a deep, elastic pile.

Link to comment

Thanks everyone. I will seek out the options mentioned. I'm really hoping this isn't something that's long term.

Link to comment

I also wonder if a Vitamin D deficiency could have something to do with it. My doctor did some blood work to see if that was the cause of the neuropathy which is what I've been diagnosed with so far. Now it's trying to find out what's causing it...i keep reading a lot about dancers not getting enough Vitamin D and I'm wondering could this be the cause of the issue too.

Link to comment

It's certainly good to get your overall health checked and make sure everything is in order. However, the symptoms you described of pain specifically associated with jumping would in most cases (speaking generally here!) be associated with a dancing issue - technique, overuse or incorrect flooring etc etc. By all means, search out all options, but I'm sure most people on this board would highly recommend you still see a dance PT as shin pain can be common for many reasons in dancers related to dance factors.

Link to comment

Yes! ^^ Very good advice!

And - if a dancer tends to pronate ("roll in") on the feet, AND if one way the dancer has tried to change that is to "pull up" the inside (medial side) of the foot, then it is _possible_ that the dancer has overused the muscles on the inside/medial lower part of the shin, also causing shin pain.

A dance-physiotherapist who watches carefully as the dancer shows a few things (plié, tendu, etc) should be able to notice this and give alternative movements to do.

 

Just a thought. :)

 

-d-

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...