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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Le Corsaire Odalisque variation


Sarabande

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So I really have no idea which forum to put this in, but here goes:

My studio does not offer any repertoire or variations classes, so I have been trying to teach myself variations from youtube videos. I have been working on learning the Odalisque variation from Le Corsaire (the 3rd one, I think- not sure? The one everyone does at YAGP). So far, so good, except for one thing- I cannot figure out from the video whether the final diagonal consists of lame ducks or step-up turns. Could someone more familiar with this variation please enlighten me?

Thank you!

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Sarabande, are you talking about piqué en dehors turns? They are sometimes called "lame duck", but that is not a term in the vocabulary of ballet. (I think the term might have been invented because when you look at someone doing them badly they can look like a lame duck. :o ) I have no idea what a 'step up' turn is, but the piqué en dehors is sometimes called a step over turn.

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Yes, I believe I am talking about piqué en dehors turns- my teacher has never called them anything but "lame ducks" and I tried without success to find a more "correct" name for them before posting. When I say "step up" turn, I am talking about a regular en dedans piqué turn in which the dancer piqués again onto the lifted leg during the turn (sort of like a cross between chainés and pique turns). Hope that makes sense!

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Okay, I got it now! Those turns are like a half piqué turn on one foot and the second half of the turn on the other. I don't they even have a name in the ballet terminology! If they do, someone please tell what it is! :)

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I've heard them referred to as a emboité turn! Not sure of the spelling or correctness of that term though... :shrug:

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I think Sarabande means that a step up turn is that awkward almost sous sus that you turn into an en de hors pirouette by picking up the passe leg quickly. That made absolutely no sense. :)

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Or the step up turn could be an outside piqué turn, in which you do pretty much the same thing described by aspirant except moving on a diagonal. I was taught that a step up turn was basically that action from a fourth postion. :dizzy::)

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Ms. Leigh- Yes! That's exactly what I meant. :)

 

As far as emboîté turns- I thought emboîté turns were a series of half turns done by hopping and picking up alternate feet to cou-de-pied devant, but I can see how that could get mixed up with what I have no other name for except "step up turn"... If anyone is still confused as to what I meant by "step up turn", see Ms. Leigh's description above...

 

I apologize for the lack of clarity- if anyone knows the correct name for these turns, please tell me!!

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As I have been taught, there are different kinds of emboîté turns: one is a jump and the other is an actual turn, as described above by Ms. Leigh. Not sure if I'm right but both of these are called emboîtés when we do them in class although they're different steps.

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The main difference is that emboités jump to cou de pied devant with both feet, while half/half piqué turns are one foot is in retiré derrière and the second one is devant. And then there the matter of the difference between the lifted foot in terms of level. I suppose they could both be emboité, but I have not heard them called that.

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