Jump to content
Ballet Talk for Dancers

Memorizing choreography and combinations


WannaPrimaMom

Recommended Posts

My DD11 recently came to me, frustrated, because she feels that she has a tough time remembering combinations, or new choreography, from one day to the next. Can anyone offer suggestions for how to work on this skill?

Link to comment

Time will certainly help. It is a skill she will develop. But why not have her create a notebook of combinations or choreography in her own abbreviations. She can then review at home.

Link to comment

DD plays a lot of brain/strategy and memory games on her iPad to help with quick thinking and memory. And, as Momof3darlings suggested, she writes her combinations in a journal and reviews the combinations.

Link to comment

DD15 has always picked up choreography fairly easily, she never wrote in a notebook but she runs choreography in her head while listening to music before bed and often can be found marking steps while walking through the house. Lately her and her friends use their phones to capture and share video of each other during class or rehearsal (when allowed) or they get together after class to do it so they can all practice on their own.

Link to comment

Thank you all for the suggestions! DD's school does not permit them to have their phones/iPods in the studio during class. She did start bringing a notebook and pen in her bag to take notes, so I'm hoping that helps.

Link to comment

The school may not allow the kids to have their cells, but if you ask, they may let a teacher film a harder combination or a rehearsal for her. Many will do this and upload to a private site so that the dancers can review. Others may feel they need to simply remember which is actually the best way in my personal opinion noting how much memory I've lost by having information in my phone so readily. Can't remember a phone number now to save my life. I used to remember almost everyone I'd ever dialed. Same with directions. Why remember them when GPS will tell you. A double edged sword.

Link to comment

As students we were advised to visual the movement as we hummed the music in our heads as we lay in bed. In this way, we could go over it and over it, but we also were prepared to ask questions about the things we could not remember. Since combinations were not repeated and we had live piano accompaniment for classes (perhaps a different accompanist each day), we were asked only to do this for choreography. For classroom work, we had to learn the combination musically and then eventually it all fell into place.

 

I would advise you ask your DD's teacher for some advise.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...