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Guest ballet_lover_nc

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Guest ballet_lover_nc

so, what you are saying miss leigh, is that the hyperextension in the knees cannot be improved in any way?

in some ways i disagree with this because the feet can be improved can they? surely this way of improving or stretching the feet is a skeletal issue? therefore the knees can become more hyperextended in some of these exercises explained (though dangerous)??????

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Although I'm not Ms. Leigh, I'd like to jump in here with a response. In a way, comparing feet to knees (and elbows, for that matter) is comparing apples and oranges. The types of joints are vastly different, and in "improving" the feet, one is almost always dealing with hypOextension, rather than hypERextension, where the joint stops short of straight in full travel; in the latter case, the joint moves PAST straight and back in full travel.

 

Hyperextension cannot be "fixed" skeletally except by massive joint replacement and surgical reworking of the musculature of the legs. That's a lot like burning down the barn in order to get rid of the mice!

 

What both Ms. Leigh and I both advocate is the use of working tools to disarm hyperextension from its potential to cause or aggravate injury. Why anyone would want to encourage hyperextension is beyond me; sort of like longing for an appendix transplant. The ways of working that we encourage are not dangerous, and have helped generations of dancers avoid injury without causing more problems in themselves, thereby surviving the test of time.

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Thanks, Major Johnson :o

 

NOTE: The question in this topic came from another thread entitled "hyperextension???", started on July 4, 2002 by alliecat93. Since that thread is relatively long, we decided to leave this one on it's own and not merge it into that one, however, I would recommend that you read that one if you would like to see where this question is coming from.

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Guest ballet_lover_nc

thanks major johnson :D well explained!!!! :)

 

talking about hyper and hypoextension, could it be possible to have hyperextension in the feet (where the joint extends beyond straight) in exceptional cases?!?!

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Oh, yes indeed!!! Hyperextension through the joints of the feet makes for the beautiful but weak "swan's-neck" foot. Learning to work the foot in order to preserve its attractiveness while still building strength is a real challenge! Now, I didn't see her as a student, but it certainly looks to me as though Paloma Herrera is one of those people who has overcome the pretty, weak feet and made them into pretty, strong feet!:)

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Guest Medora

I don't understand what you mean by hyperextension in the feet, but I have very pretty feet (or at least people tell me that, not to be bragedy!!) It took me a much longer time though to strengthen my feet to the point that I could releve at ease. My teacher told me that this was because more archy feet are weaker than flatter feet and that it would take more time and effort to strengthen them. Also, she said that people with flatter feet make better jumpers than people with weak archy feet. I have also had to work harder at petite allegro than the other people in my class!

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OK, Medora, hyperextension of any joint means that it moves "past" straight, that is is begins to form a reflex angle when the joint is moved to full travel. It surpasses a straight axis made by following the line of the adjacent long bone. Fingers and toes(!) can hyperextend.

 

What you're describing is exactly the kind of difficulty students experience with some or all of the joints of the foot more or less hyperextended. It's a real grind, and you have to stay on it all the time, but the results are worth it! How fortunate you are to have a teacher who recognizes this problem, and helps you conquer it!

 

:)

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vB software makes it possible for .jpg files to be attached to posts right here, but I'm not certain whether Alexandra (the site owner) has enabled it for the Young Dancers' forums. You can try by making sure the picture is a .jpg file, then copy-and-paste the file name to the "attachments" window below. Just make sure the file isn't bigger than 32000 bytes.

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