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Gretchen75

Name of ballet turn?

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Gretchen75

There is a turn in my ballet class that they call a soutenu, but it's entirely different from anything that I can find online. I'd like to find some technique videos for it, if it's even possible. My description of the turn/spin is: the standing leg is slightly bent and you turn on that foot. The working leg is extended and the toe brushes the floor as you turn in a circle. It reminds me of a simple ice-skating move. Has anyone ever seen this or know what it's usually called?

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BalletFamily

Could it be a detourné?  I'm having a hard time finding a video or something, and it seems that, like with a lot of ballet moves, one term can refer to different movements.  The videos I see are for smaller movement versions.  But the one we do in my classes that we call a detourné is just like you describe.

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Redbookish

Yes it's a soutenue, but some naming systems call it a detourné, or demi-detourné. It's one of those linking steps which can be choreographed in a number of ways. A demi assemblé soutenue is often used at the barre as a preparation for ronde de jambe á terre. We were just doing them in my class (a basic beginners the other day!

You might find clips on YouTube or Instagram, but it's a step you'll do a lot in class, particularly if your teacher requires a formal finish to each barre exercise and the "correct" way of turning to the other side - by a soutenue or detourné.

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Chasse Away

I don’t know if I would call that a soutenue, to me, a soutenue is something that pulls you up, or “sucks up like a straw”. Correct me if I’m wrong but to be a soutenue I believe you have to finish with both legs on the ground on demi pointe or pointe. 
 

Some schools use the term soutenue to describe all sorts of turns, I’ve heard it used when describing glissade en tournents and pirouettes in cou de pied, but technically neither of those are soutenues.

Unless it is a demi assemble soutenue like Redbookish is talking about I don’t think what you refer to is a soutenue. 

 

I think I know the step you are talking about, to me it sounds like a pirouette on a forced arch with the foot a la second a terre. But I think it’s a more modern/contemporary turn so it doesn’t have an “official” classical ballet name to describe it.  
 

 

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Miss Persistent
On 1/12/2020 at 4:14 AM, Gretchen75 said:

 the standing leg is slightly bent and you turn on that foot. The working leg is extended and the toe brushes the floor as you turn in a circle. It reminds me of a simple ice-skating move.

Do you mean that the working leg is extended and remains straight as you turn? As in your toe is drawing a circle on the floor?

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Gretchen75

Yes!😊

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EAC

I think what you are describing is what I would call a "compass turn." It is named after the compass drawing tool, not the navigation instrument. This is not a ballet move that I know of, but is used often in jazz and modern. 

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Redbookish

Oh that sounds like a variation on a terr a terre turn, or any number of linking steps such as something a bit like a demi-contretemps but not jumped.

Or the jazz turn, where you step out, leave the other leg in a sort of drag, then turn in on yourself, keeping the second leg out in that drag position. I'be never heard it called a compass turn, but that's what it looks like!

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Miss Persistent
On 1/13/2020 at 11:31 AM, Gretchen75 said:

Yes!😊

In RAD, this movement just popped up in the latest incarnation of the syllabus and is called a "skimming ronds de jambe". It can be done with the leg held in a position, or with the leg moving say from derriere or 2nd to devant. 

I have no idea why exactly it came into the syllabus - it does help train students with control, turning action, dynamics, and co-ordinations, however I would not personally say it is part of "traditional" ballet vocabulary.  I would say it is more like a choreographic movement that has become part of ballet as new choreography has emerged in the same way many 'classical' choreographers now use parallel alignments etc. However now those things are emerging in repertoire, we need to train to perform them, hence perhaps its inclusion? I am only speculating!

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